We are so excited to share with you our 2020–21 virtual concert season! We have a line-up of performances from the Sebastians archives, plus some special brand-new recordings still in progress, and we are thrilled to share these vibrant recordings with you. We have so many wonderful memories of our past concerts — so many moments of the electric excitement that come from sharing emotional experiences with you, our beloved audience. We all look forward to coming together in community, but until that is possible, we hope to brighten your day with these videos.

It is a difficult time for so many, including artists, and we’re so very grateful that with your generous support, we are doing what we can to keep our musical community afloat. Our virtual season will be free to all, so that everyone can enjoy these recordings, and we ask that you consider donating if you can.

We look forward to returning to the concert hall, but for now, we hope these videos brighten your day.

2020–21 Virtual Season

Sunday, March 28, 2021

Bach’s St. Matthew Passion

We are thrilled to share our performance of J.S. Bach’s St. Matthew Passion from March 2019—an amazing collaboration with TENET Vocal Artists that The New York Times acclaimed as a “shattering” Critic’s Pick. The performance is now available!

Directors Jeffrey Grossman and Jolle Greenleaf will host a Zoom gathering to discuss the project on Sunday, March 28, from 5–5:30pm.

TENET and the Sebastians perform St. Matthew Passion

Support the Sebastians

We appreciate the support of our patrons and friends through these difficult times. As a 501(c)3 non-profit we are dedicated to continuing our mission of bringing baroque music to life and supporting musicians, and your gifts help make that possible.

Yes, I would like to support the Sebastians music-making with a tax-deductible donation:

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You can give using the secure form above, or send a check to “Sebastian Chamber Players” at 163 Saint Nicholas Ave. #2H, New York, NY 10026.


Thank You to Our 2020–2021 Supporters

$10,000+

  • Anonymous
  • Beth & Jeff Davidson
  • Edith Carol Stein
  • Pandemic support from the U.S. Small Business Administration

$5,000+

  • New York State Council on the Arts
  • New York City Department of Cultural Affairs

$1,000+

  • Susan & Chip Fisher
  • Dorothy Haase
  • Bradford & Christine Hinze
  • Patrick Ravey
  • Alfred & Jane Ross
  • William Seltzer & Jane Berger

$500+

  • Anonymous (2)
  • David & Sandy Feingold
  • Jim & Joyce Javid
  • Philip Mindlin
  • Tamara Mitchel & Daniel Ross

$250+

  • Roger & Whitney Bagnall
  • Peggy & Johnny Bishop
  • Yvonne Chang
  • Barbara Cooper
  • Martin Smith
  • Michael & Evelyn Solomon
  • Rosalie Stone

$100+

  • Anonymous (2)
  • Janice Blum
  • Betsy & Wes Dain
  • Michele Dellinger
  • Jonathan Hatch & Eve Goodman
  • Ann Holtwick
  • Andrea Prigot & Haig Hovaness
  • Zina Jasper
  • Michele Jerison
  • Edward & Wendy Katkin
  • Robert Kenet
  • Gloria & Joseph Latona
  • Donna Firer & Brian McLaughlin
  • Arthur Shippee & Mary Porterfield
  • Sharon Lee Ryder
  • Fran Samuels
  • Alberto Minujin & Jace Schinderman
  • Karen McLaughlin & Mark Schubin
  • David Starr
  • Frederick Toms
  • Jane Troy

<$100

  • Anonymous
  • Carol Holmes Alpern
  • Lewis Baratz
  • Gail Brousal
  • Ellen Maria Bruzelius
  • Giuliana Carugati
  • William Coakley
  • Hannah Collins
  • Ruth Cross
  • Cheryl Dixon & Erik Paul
  • David Doster
  • Elaine Edelman
  • Dennis Edemeka
  • Daniel Ellis
  • Alan Goldberg
  • Sue Gronewold
  • Diane Huntzicker
  • Randy Katz
  • Lynne Killin
  • Kenneth Kliban
  • Jack & Anne Mazelis
  • Joan Melton
  • Renée Mittler
  • Judith Moldover
  • Doug Ramsdell
  • Paul & Faina Ross
  • Margaret Spier
NYC Cultural Affairs Logo

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

NYSCA Logo

The Sebastians 2020–21 concerts are made possible, in part, by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

The Sebastians activities are additionally supported by the Maxwell Shepherd Memorial Arts Fund.

*This list up-to-date as of April 4, 2021. Please forgive any errors or omissions.

March 25, 2021 at 7pm

The Sebastians at Home

Livestream concert

Nicholas DiEugenio

violin

Jeffrey Grossman

harpsichord

Daniel S. Lee

violin

Ezra Seltzer

cello

Mimi Solomon

fortepiano

View Concert program

Musicians

(in order of appearance)
Ezra Seltzer, cello
Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
Daniel Lee, violin
Nicholas DiEugenio, violin
Mimi Solomon, fortepiano

Program

Giuseppe Colombi
(1635–94)
Partite sopra il basso di Ciaccona for solo cello

Johann Sebastian Bach
(1685–1750)
Partita no. 4 in D major, BWV 828 (1728) for keyboard

Elisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre
(1665–1729)
Sonata no. 3 in F major (1707) for violin and basso continuo

Franz Schubert
(1797–1828)
Sonata no. 4 in A major, “Grand Duo,” op. posth. 162, D. 574 (1817) for violin and piano

Joseph Bologne, Le Chevalier de Saint-Georges
(1745–99)
Sonata no. 1 in Bb major, op. 1a (c. 1770) for violin and harpsichord

And join us back here this Sunday for the release of our performance of Bach’s St. Matthew Passion!

March 18, 2021

Sonata for violin and harpsichord in E major, BWV 1016 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)

From the opening moments of this sonata, Bach evokes majesty with thick writing in the harpsichord (listen to the “tolling bell” in the left hand) combined with an incredible soaring violin melody. After a puckish second movement, the third movement, in the key of C-sharp minor, returns to the majestic mood of the opening. (This slow movement is one of Jeffrey’s favorites.) The explosion of joy in the last movement is a fitting end to a very special work.

Performed live 2018 November 12
Morse Recital Hall in Sprague Memorial Hall
Yale University School of Music Faculty Recital Series

  • Daniel Lee, violin
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord

March 6, 2021

Sonata for violin and harpsichord in B minor, BWV 1014 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)

Bach uses the key of B minor for particularly special pieces—for example, the Mass in B minor and the B minor flute sonata are incredibly emotional works. The pathos-filled harpsichord introduction of this sonata immediately creates quite a special mood. Daniel and Jeffrey have loved this sonata for years. They chose it to record on their duo album, the Sebastians a 2: Virtuoso Music of the Holy Roman Empire.

Performed live 2018 November 12
Morse Recital Hall in Sprague Memorial Hall
Yale University School of Music Faculty Recital Series

  • Daniel Lee, violin
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord

March 1, 2021

Sonata for violin and harpsichord in C minor, BWV 1017 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)

These sonatas for harpsichord and violin are famous for giving the harpsichord an equal role in the musical drama, but Bach breaks the mold in the two slow movements of the C minor sonata—the violin has a two beautiful tunes and the harpsichord merely accompanies. The opening movement’s melody is reminiscent of Bach’s alto aria Erbarme dich, from the St. Matthew Passion—famous for its gorgeous violin solo. By contrast, the fast movements allow the harpsichord to share the spotlight again. We enjoy this dark sonata for the twists and turns of the fast movements, especially against the simpler beauty of the slow ones!

Performed live 2018 November 12
Morse Recital Hall in Sprague Memorial Hall
Yale University School of Music Faculty Recital Series

  • Daniel Lee, violin
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord

February 13, 2021

Sonata for violin and harpsichord in G major, BWV 1019 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)

Bach’s six sonatas for violin and harpsichord are among the first of their kind—the violin and harpsichord, equal partners! The G major is the only one of the set to be in five movements as opposed to four. The fast movements are mostly cheery and bubbly, separated by shorter, more contemplative movements. Bach revised its structure a few times, and in this version (the final), the harpsichord has a solo movement in the center of the piece—another odd feature of this sonata!

Performed live 2018 November 12
Morse Recital Hall in Sprague Memorial Hall
Yale University School of Music Faculty Recital Series

  • Daniel Lee, violin
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord

January 31, 2021

Sonata in D major, HWV 371 (c. 1749–50) George Frideric Handel (1685–1759)

I remember being captivated by the opening of this sonata the first time I heard it. Handel begins with a D major arpeggio, but instead of the octave D, the fourth note is an E—unexpected, almost like a trapeze artist overshooting the next ring! This piece is filled with Handel’s signature genius, from the beautiful melodic turns of the first movement through the virtuosic galloping second, to the proud Larghetto and jaunty closing movement.

Performed live 7 May 2019
Good Shepherd-Faith Presbyterian Church, New York City

  • Daniel Lee, violin
  • Ezra Seltzer, violoncello
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • Please excuse our video and audio quality!

December 21, 2020

“The Bach Double,” BWV 1043 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)

The piece that everybody knows as the “Bach Double,” concerto for two violins, is actually just a concerto grosso by another name. The solo group of two violins trades and is reinforced by the larger forces of the tutti. In fact, Bach’s title on the manuscript is “Concerto à 6, 2 violini concertini, 2 violini e 1 viola da ripieni, violoncello e continuo.” From the infectious energy of the opening statement, to the glorious, lyrical second movement, to the furious counterpoint of the finale, it’s easy to understand why this piece has reached such a vaunted place in the classical music canon!

Performed live 7 May 2019
Good Shepherd-Faith Presbyterian Church, New York City

  • Nicholas DiEugenio and Daniel Lee, solo violin
  • Beth Wenstrom and Edson Scheid, orchestra violin
  • Jessica Troy, viola
  • Ezra Seltzer, violoncello
  • Nathaniel Chase, contrabass
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • We hope you enjoy this video in spite of its “live” video and audio quality!

November 29, 2020

Concerto no. 4 in F minor, L’Inverno (“Winter”) Antonio Vivaldi (1678–1741)

For this performance in 2014, we included readings of the sonnets Vivaldi included in the music by actor Cassandra Stokes-Wylie—just out of frame of the video. In the published scores, the sonnets are divided up and printed throughout the music.

Performed live 13 December 2014
All Angels’ Church, New York City

  • Cassandra Stokes-Wylie, actor
  • Daniel Lee, solo violin
  • Nicholas DiEugenio, Dongmyung Ahn, violins
  • Kyle Miller, viola
  • Hannah Collins, cello
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord & organ
  • Joseph Patrych, audio and video recording
  • Overtone Audio, audio mastering and video editing

Concerto no. 3 in F major, L’Autunno (“Autumn”) Antonio Vivaldi (1678–1741)

Vivaldi depicts an exuberant country autumn, from the dances of the first movement to the sleepy middle Adagio, and finally to the joys of the hunt!

Performed live 13 December 2014
All Angels’ Church, New York City

  • Cassandra Stokes-Wylie, actor
  • Nicholas DiEugenio, solo violin
  • Dongmyung Ahn, Daniel Lee, violins
  • Kyle Miller, viola
  • Hannah Collins, cello
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord & organ
  • Joseph Patrych, audio and video recording
  • Overtone Audio, audio mastering and video editing

November 21, 2020

Sonata quinta (1641) Giovanni Battista Fontana (?1589–?1630)

We love the meandering music of Fontana, and this cheery sonata is a great example. There’s only one surviving collection of his music—just eighteen sonatas, published after his death, including six sonatas for solo violin and continuo. This has the distinction of being possibly the shortest of those six solo sonatas!

Performed live 17 September 2019
Alchemical Studios, Greenwich Village

  • Daniel Lee, violin
  • Charles Weaver, theorbo
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • Please excuse the live audio and video quality!

Sonata prima (1621) Dario Castello (fl. 1590–1630)

Many composers of this era left little evidence of their lives, but none so much as Dario Castello. We have just a couple volumes of published music, and the record of his baptism and death, both in Venice. Castello is the exemplar of the Italian stylus fantasticus, the “most free and unrestrained method of composing,” according to contemporary Athanasius Kircher.

Performed live 17 September 2019
Alchemical Studios, Greenwich Village

  • Daniel Lee, violin
  • Charles Weaver, theorbo
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • Please excuse our live audio and video quality!

Sonata no. 10 (1649) Marco Uccellini (c. 1603/10–80)

Judging from his music, Uccellini was a fantastic violinist. He seems to enjoy including high, virtuosic passagework for the violinist. Like his contemporaries, Uccellini’s sonatas are freely-structured, with short sections usually based on singular motivic ideas. This short sonata, mostly sunny sonata begins almost like a fantasia but Uccellini can’t resist a good, rhythmic sequence!

Performed live 17 September 2019
Alchemical Studios, Greenwich Village

  • Daniel Lee, violin
  • Charles Weaver, theorbo
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • Please excuse the live audio and video!

November 8, 2020

Sonata op. 3, no. 1 (1652) Giovanni Antonio Leoni (?late 16th cent.–after 1651)

Daniel and Jeffrey “discovered” this short, sweet sonata on a retreat at the wonderful Avaloch Farm Music Institute in Boscawen, NH. The only music of Leoni that survives is this volume of violin sonatas, opus 3, filled with similar examples of the Italian stylus fantasticus.

Performed live 17 September 2019
Alchemical Studios, Greenwich Village

  • Daniel Lee, violin
  • Charles Weaver, theorbo
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • Please excuse the truly “live” audio and video quality!

Amarilli, mia bella Giulio Caccini (1551–1618), arr. Peter Philips (1560/1–1628)

Many of us know the solo madrigal Amarilli, mia bella from young voice students working on the “24” (Schirmer’s Twenty-Four Italian Songs and Arias). It was actually the most famous piece included in Giulio Caccini’s Le nuove musiche (1602) and was widely disseminated long before Schirmer published its own (terrible) arrangement. Peter Philips arranged it for keyboard, but his version is not even based on the original song; his source was likely a six-part arrangement published in Antwerp in 1601.

Performed live 17 September 2019
Alchemical Studios, Greenwich Village

  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • Please excuse the “live” audio quality!

November 3, 2020

Sonade from La Piémontoise, Les Nations (Paris, 1726) François Couperin (1668–1733)

François Couperin is known for his attempts to unite the musical styles of France and Italy—to reconcile the orderly predictability of Italian instrumental music with the sensual harmonies and ornaments of the French style. In Les Nations, the opening movement of each suite—the Sonade, or instrumental sonata—evokes a particular country or region: in this case, the Piedmont region of northern Italy. It’s our favorite of the four Nations!

Performed live 7 May 2019
Good Shepherd-Faith Presbyterian Church, New York City

  • Daniel Lee and Nicholas DiEugenio, violin
  • Ezra Seltzer, violoncello
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • Please excuse our very “live” audio and video quality!

October 10, 2020

Sonata in C major, op. 5, no. 3 Arcangelo Corelli (1653–1713)

The magic of Corelli’s music is that it can make you feel simultaneously like all is well-ordered in the universe—a feeling we are all searching for these days!—and also like anything can happen. Take a trip to Rome with us and enjoy Corelli’s symmetrical phrases, delicate figurations, and elegant melodies.

Performed live 17 September 2019
Alchemical Studios, Greenwich Village

  • Daniel Lee, violin
  • Charles Weaver, theorbo
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • Please excuse our very “live” audio quality!

Sonata, op. 1, no. 1 (1717) Giovanni Mossi (c. 1680–1742)

Virtuoso violinist Giovanni Mossi certainly knew Corelli (though don’t believe the rumors that he was a student of Corelli!). It was a lot of fun to discover and put this exciting sonata together—from its improvisatory opening fantasia to its virtuosic fast movements.

Performed live 23 February 2019
Good Shepherd-Faith Presbyterian Church, New York City

  • Nicholas DiEugenio, violin
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • Please excuse this intimate, dimly-lit concert video!

October 4, 2020

Concerto grosso in D major, op. 6, no. 4 Arcangelo Corelli (1653–1713)

This concerto grosso is one of our long-time favorites. It’s hard to go wrong with Corelli’s sparkling writing for the violin and dazzling interplay between the solo trio and the band—this concerto in particular has such a fun “mad dash” to the finish line, it never fails to make us smile.

Performed live 7 May 2019
Good Shepherd-Faith Presbyterian Church, New York City

  • Daniel Lee and Beth Wenstrom, concertino violin
  • Ezra Seltzer, concertino violoncello
  • Nicholas DiEugenio and Edson Scheid, ripieno violin
  • Jessica Troy, viola
  • Nathaniel Chase, contrabass
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • Please excuse our video and audio quality!

September 25, 2020

Cento partite sopra passacagli Girolamo Frescobaldi (1583–1643)

Frescobaldi’s gigantic variation set—100 variations!—is considered one of the longest 17th-century solo Italian keyboard work. All the tempos are related to one another, in sometimes mysterious and rather crazy ways…

Performed live 17 September 2019
Alchemical Studios, Greenwich Village

  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord
  • Please excuse the rough audio quality!

September 12, 2020

Cantata BWV 51 “Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen!” Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750)

Our first selection is Bach’s joyous Cantata 51, “Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen” (Shout for joy to God in all lands), featuring the radiant Katharine Dain and magnificent Steven Marquardt. In these troubled times we think “joy” is something we could all use.

Performed live 8 December 2019
Collinsville Congregational Church
The Maxwell Shepherd Memorial Arts Fund’s Shepherd Music Series

  • Katharine Dain, soprano
  • Steven Marquardt, trumpet
  • Nicholas DiEugenio and Daniel Lee, violin
  • Chiara Fasani Stauffer, viola
  • Joshua Stauffer, theorbo
  • Matt Zucker, cello
  • Nathaniel Chase, contrabass
  • Jeffrey Grossman, harpsichord and organ
  • STUDIOTEO, audio and video recording
Show Texts and Translations
 

Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen!

Cantata for the Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity
1. Arie
Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen!
Was der Himmel und die Welt
An Geschöpfen in sich hält
Müssen dessen Ruhm erhöhen
Und wir wollen unserm Gott
Gleichfalls itzt ein Opfer bringen
Daß er uns in Kreuz und Not
Allezeit hat beigestanden.
Shout for joy to God in all lands!
Whatever creatures heaven and earth
Contain
Must exalt His glory
And we too would now bring
An offering to our God
For in cross-bearing and distress
He has at all times stood by us.
2. Rezitativ
Wir beten zu dem Tempel an
Da Gottes Ehre wohnet
Da dessen Treu
So täglich neu
Mit lauter Segen lohnet.
Wir preisen was er an uns hat getan.
Muß gleich der schwache Mund von seinen Wundern lallen
So kann ein schlechtes Lob ihm dennoch wohlgefallen.
We worship towards the Temple
Where God’s honor dwells
Where His faithfulnessDaily renewed
Rewards us with pure blessing.
We praise what He has done for us.
Though our weak mouths must babble about His marvels
Yet wretched praise can nonetheless please Him.
3. Arie
Höchster mache deine Güte
Ferner alle Morgen neu.
So soll vor die Vatertreu
Auch ein dankbares Gemüte
Durch ein frommes Leben weisen
Daß wir deine Kinder heißen.
O Highest One make Your goodness
Henceforth new every morning.
Then for Your fatherly faithfulness
A grateful spirit in return
Shall show through its devout life
That we are called Your children.
4. Choral
Sei Lob und Preis mit Ehren
Gott Vater Sohn Heiligem Geist!
Der woll in uns vermehren
Was er uns aus Gnaden verheißt
Daß wir ihm fest vertrauen
Gänzlich uns lass’n auf ihn
Von Herzen auf ihn bauen
Daß uns’r Herz Mut und Sinn
Ihm festiglich anhangen;
Drauf singen wir zur Stund:
Amen wir werdn’s erlangen
Glaub’n wir aus Herzensgrund.
Blessing and praise with honor be
to God the Father Son and Holy Spirit!
Who would increase in us
What He Promises us out of grace
That we hold fast our confidence in Him
Fully rely on Him
Build on Him from our hearts
That our heart courage and mind
Cleave firmly to Him;Of this we sing at this hour:
Amen we will obtain itIf we have faith at all times.
5. Arie
Alleluja!
Alleluia!
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